Senso-ji Tokyo
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General information
General information Tokyo
6
General information On our way back we took the Airport Limousine bus. These buses go directly to and from the airport to the main hotels in Tokyo center, the drive takes about one hour, depending on the traffic and costs Yen 3200 per person (2016). Our hotel made the reservation for the Airport Limousine bus for us. The journey was very comfortable and we did not had to carry around our luggage in the subway stations. Find more information at: https://www.limousinebus.co.jp/en/
Transportation from and to the Narita International Airport.  This airport lies 57 km outside of Tokyo and has three terminals. There are several ways to go to Tokyo center. We took the JR Narita Express (NEX) train, which departs every 30 minutes in the basement of the airport and goes directly to Tokyo Station, where you can take another train or the Tokyo subway. The trip takes about one hour and costs Yen 3000 one way ticket per person (2016). A ticket can be bought at the JR Narita Express (NEX) train desk. On your ticket is the number of your wagon and seat printed, the train is comfortable and clean, all the important information is announced also in English.  You do not need to buy an extra ticket for the NEX, if you have already a Japan Rail Pass ticket. Just check the validity date of your Japan Rail Pass ticket at the desk of the Japan Railways. If you also go back with the JR Narita Express (NEX) train, do not forget to make a reservation for the way back! Find more information at: JR east ticket centre Narita Airport
Public transport There is a large variety of public transport which are operated by many different companies, which are all efficient, very clean and safe. The JR East train and the subway are the most suitable for moving around Tokyo center. The only problem is how to buy the tickets, the ticket machines are often only in Japanese and the staff speaks poor English. 1. Taxi’s, are rather expensive in Tokyo 2. Subway, is very efficient, one find clear maps in every travel guide, besides this one can download the Tokyo subway app on the smartphone, which is a pleasant and useful app. During our stay we only used the subway, we bought special tourist tickets at the airport. Find more information at: 3. Monorail/JR Yamanote Line circles around Tokyo and stops at the major city centers, where one can buy the tickets at the station. 4. Buses, https://www.gotokyo.org/en/tourists/info/access/access3.html 5. The bullet train/Shinkansen (JR), these high speed trains (320 km/h) connect Tokyo with most of Japan’s important cities. There are different types of trains on most lines, trains that stop at every station and trains that stops only on the main stations. The Japan Rail Pass can be bought with a discount in advance before going to Japan.
Tokyo tourist subway tickets
What we noticed in Tokyo Many men wear black suits with a white shirt or an uniform. A lot of women are elegant dressed by wearing a short beige trench coat and skin- colored nylon stockings School children wear uniforms also a lot of teenage girls wear uniforms Lots of Japanese wear surgical masks Japanese stay out of the sun and protect themselves with clothes and an umbrella It is extremely clean, really clean Japanese people respect each other and others belongings, you don’t see any pick pocketing. They leave their belongings unattended on the table while going to the restroom or counter. They are very disciplined, they wait before the subway door in a straight line During rush hours or busy crossing there are men in uniform to regulate the traffic by shouting something in Japanese (not really necessary to my opinion because Japanese people are very disciplined) Japanese are very respectful and helpful and if you buy something they bow Some Japanese people speak poor English which can sometimes be a problem and our Japanese is also poor :) Love hotels where Japanese people can hire a room for only a few hours to have some quality time together
Tokyo black suits
View points During our stay, we had a hotel room at the 36 floor, so we had a magnificent view over the city, one clear day, we even saw mount Fuji, so we did not feel the need to visit one of the two towers of Tokyo, the Tokyo Tower and the Tokyo Skytree
Japanese toilet with electronics Japanese toilet electronics
Shops and fashion Shops can be found of course in whole Tokyo. We mention a few shopping areas, which we have visited ourselves. Most shops are open from 10.00 – 21.00 hrs. Convenience Stores can be found in every street or shopping center. Some famous brands are Family Mart, 7 Eleven and Lawson. In these retail stores you will find a wide range of products; groceries, food, beverage, magazines, news paper, personal care products and an ATM machine to obtain some Yens. In the Ginza district one can find shops from all the expensive famous West European brands and labels, which can also be found in for example Fifth Avenue in New York. The Shibuya district is a very trendy shopping district where one can find lots of large department stores. Shibuya is a cradle for the origin of many trends in fashion and entertainment.  In the Harajuku district the Takeshita Street can be found, in this street the teenagers dress up like their favorite manga hero. Besides this there are many trendy shops, outlets, vintage stores and restaurants.  We liked the shops around the Senso-ji Temple very much, where you can buy original and affordable souvenirs.
Tokyo subway app Tokyo subway app
Hanami Cherry Blossom Festival March – April The reason why we have visited Japan this time of the year, was because of the Hanami festival. As you can see on our photos and videos, it is really an important festival. Hanami means flower viewing. This can best be done in one of the many beautiful gardens and parks. The Japanese people are sitting under the Cherry trees on a mostly blue canvas, eating and drinking beer with friends, family or colleagues. The deeper meaning of this festival is the reflection on the transience of the beauty of the nature and the transience of life itself.
Hanami Tokyo
Tokyo subway app
Cherry Blossom Toyo Hanami
Religion in Japan Japan has basically two religions Shinto and Buddhism, that overlap and complete each other. Shinto with its thousand Gods (kami) is an old folk religion based on rituals to obtain a good relationship with the Gods, to provide them for example a good harvest. The soul and the spirit of the Gods can live in things like an old tree, mountain, houses, areas etc.  In the 6th century Buddhism was imported from India via Korea. The Shinto Gods and the Buddhist bosatsu are integrated with each other. Religion is still very much alive in Japan, many Japanese practice both Shinto and Buddhism. Shinto is often seen as the religion during their life (they usually get married according to the Shinto ritual) while Buddhism is seen as the religion for the life after death (reincarnation and nirwana). Funerals usually go according to the Buddhist ritual. Shinto has nothing to offer after death. In fact, Shinto considers everything that has to do with blood and death as impure. For business after the death grasps the Japanese, partly for that reason, to Buddhism. Indeed, Buddhism promises deliverance from this life of suffering. Most Japanese have at home two altars, a Shinto (kamidana) and a Buddhist altar (butsudan). You will find the following rituals and symbols around Japanese Temples and Shrines. A Torri, this is a traditional Japanese gate which is found at the entrance of a Shinto shrine, where it marks the transition from the sacred area around the shrine. Sometimes there are dogs to protect the Shinto complex. The Japanese symbolically purifying themselves with water (first the left hand, right hand and then the mouth), before entering a shrine and interacting with the kami. The burning of incense, waving the smoke towards themselves for purification and good luck but also as an aid in prayers. Fox Kitsune (it wears sometimes a red slack), he is the messenger and protector of the kami Inari. Kami Inari is very important for the Japanese, because he is the God of the rice and prosperity. Ema is a small wooden plaques on which one can write their wishes or prayers. Omikuji are fortune telling papers, which can be found in a kind of dresser with many drawers. On the paper you can read your predictions which can vary from daikichi (good luck) to daikyo (bad luck).  If you have bad luck you can tie the paper around a tree's branch to leave it behind you. Shops buy all kind of luck amulets (omamori) with bells on them.
  Torri purifying with water Omikuji
In Japan a lot is still paid by cash, although most hotels accept VISA or AMEX credit cards. You can of course take an amount of Yen with you but you can also withdraw cash at an ATM machine, which you can find at a post office (nearby the main railway stations) or a convenience store.
Money in Japan The Japanese yen (¥) is the official currency of Japan. They are available in bank notes of 1000, 5000 and 10000 and coins 500, 100, 50, 10, 5 and 1.
Vending machines are a great invention, you will find them everywhere really everywhere. For soft drinks or hot drinks even hot food.
Toilets, the Japanese toilets are full with electronics, buttons for every kind of bidget and shower option and the seat is heated.
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  CityWalkSights.com     City walks along main sights, maps and an informative travel blog
hotel tip Tokyo
Hotel tip Tokyo: The hotel we stayed during our visited was the Royal Park hotel Shiodome Tokyo it is situated in the Shimbashi district, this hotel was a good choice, the people are friendly, the rooms are clean, the beds are comfortable, breakfast is good and the hotel lies close to two main subway stations (Shimbashi and Shiodome).
If you are interested in this or another hotel in Tokyo, please check here for the availability and best offers.
Booking.com
hotel tip Volendam
General information Tokyo JR east ticket centre Narita Airport
On our way back we took the Airport Limousine bus. These buses go directly to and from the airport to the main hotels in Tokyo center, the drive takes about one hour, depending on the traffic and costs Yen 3200 per person (2016). Our hotel made the reservation for the Airport Limousine bus for us. The journey was very comfortable and we did not had to carry around our luggage in the subway stations. Find more information at: https://www.limousinebus.co.jp/en/
Public transport There is a large variety of public transport which are operated by many different companies, which are all efficient, very clean and safe. The JR East train and the subway are the most suitable for moving around Tokyo center. The only problem is how to buy the tickets, the ticket machines are often only in Japanese and the staff speaks poor English. 1. Taxi’s, are rather expensive in Tokyo 2. Subway, is very efficient, one find clear maps in every travel guide, besides this one can download the Tokyo subway app on the smartphone, which is a pleasant and useful app. During our stay we only used the subway, we bought special tourist tickets at the airport. Find more information at:
Tokyo tourist subway tickets Tokyo subway app Tokyo subway app
3. Monorail/JR Yamanote Line circles around Tokyo and stops at the major city centers, where one can buy the tickets at the station. 4. Buses, https://www.gotokyo.org/en/tourists/info/access/ac cess3.html 5. The bullet train/Shinkansen (JR), these high speed trains (320 km/h) connect Tokyo with most of Japan’s important cities. There are different types of trains on most lines, trains that stop at every station and trains that stops only on the main stations. The Japan Rail Pass can be bought with a discount in advance before going to Japan.
Money The Japanese yen (¥) is the official currency of Japan. They are available in bank notes of 1000, 5000 and 10000 and coins 500, 100, 50, 10, 5 and 1.
Tokyo black suits
Vending machines are a great invention, you will find them everywhere really everywhere. For soft drinks or hot drinks even hot food.
Toilets, the Japanese toilets are full with electronics, buttons for every kind of bidget and shower option and the seat is heated.
Japanese toilet with electronics Japanese toilet electronics
View points During our stay, we had a hotel room at the 36 floor, so we had a magnificent view over the city, one clear day, we even saw mount Fuji, so we did not feel the need to visit one of the two towers of Tokyo, the Tokyo Tower and the Tokyo Skytree
Hanami Cherry Blossom Festival March – April The reason why we have visited Japan this time of the year, was because of the Hanami festival. As you can see on our photos and videos, it is really an important festival. Hanami means flower viewing. This can best be done in one of the many beautiful gardens and parks. The Japanese people are sitting under the Cherry trees on a mostly blue canvas, eating and drinking beer with friends, family or colleagues. The deeper meaning of this festival is the reflection on the transience of the beauty of the nature and the transience of life itself.
Hanami Tokyo Cherry Blossom Toyo Hanami
This airport lies 57 km outside of Tokyo and has three terminals. There are several ways to go to Tokyo center. We took the JR Narita Express (NEX) train, which departs every 30 minutes in the basement of the airport and goes directly to Tokyo Station, where you can take another train or the Tokyo subway. The trip takes about one hour and costs Yen 3000 one way ticket per person (2016). A ticket can be bought at the JR Narita Express (NEX) train desk. On your ticket is the number of your wagon and seat printed, the train is comfortable and clean, all the important information is announced also in English. You do not need to buy an extra ticket for the NEX, if you have already a Japan Rail Pass ticket. Just check the validity date of your Japan Rail Pass ticket at the desk of the Japan Railways. If you also go back with the JR Narita Express (NEX) train, do not forget to make a reservation for the way back! Find more information at:
A lot of women are elegant dressed by wearing a short beige trench coat and skin-colored nylon stockings School children wear uniforms also a lot of teenage girls wear uniforms Lots of Japanese wear surgical masks Japanese stay out of the sun and protect themselves with clothes and an umbrella It is extremely clean, really clean Japanese people respect each other and others belongings, you don’t see any pick pocketing. They leave their belongings unattended on the table while going to the restroom or counter. They are very disciplined, they wait before the subway door in a straight line During rush hours or busy crossing there are men in uniform to regulate the traffic by shouting something in Japanese (not really necessary to my opinion because Japanese people are very disciplined) Japanese are very respectful and helpful and if you buy something they bow Some Japanese people speak poor English which can sometimes be a problem and our Japanese is also poor :) Love hotels where Japanese people can hire a room for only a few hours to have some quality time together
Shops and fashion Shops can be found of course in whole Tokyo. We mention a few shopping areas, which we have visited ourselves. Most shops are open from 10.00 – 21.00 hrs. Convenience Stores can be found in every street or shopping center. Some famous brands are Family Mart, 7 Eleven and Lawson. In these retail stores you will find a wide range of products; groceries, food, beverage, magazines, news paper, personal care products and an ATM machine to obtain some Yens. In the Ginza district one can find shops from all the expensive famous West European brands and labels, which can also be found in for example Fifth Avenue in New York. The Shibuya district is a very trendy shopping district where one can find lots of large department stores. Shibuya is a cradle for the origin of many trends in fashion and entertainment.  In the Harajuku district the Takeshita Street can be found, in this street the teenagers dress up like their favorite manga hero. Besides this there are many trendy shops, outlets, vintage stores and restaurants.  We liked the shops around the Senso-ji Temple very much, where you can buy original and affordable souvenirs.
Religion in Japan Japan has basically two religions Shinto and Buddhism, that overlap and complete each other. Shinto with its thousand Gods (kami) is an old folk religion based on rituals to obtain a good relationship with the Gods, to provide them for example a good harvest. The soul and the spirit of the Gods can live in things like an old tree, mountain, houses, areas etc.  In the 6th century Buddhism was imported from India via Korea. The Shinto Gods and the Buddhist bosatsu are integrated with each other. Religion is still very much alive in Japan, many Japanese practice both Shinto and Buddhism. Shinto is often seen as the religion during their life (they usually get married according to the Shinto ritual) while Buddhism is seen as the religion for the life after death (reincarnation and nirwana). Funerals usually go according to the Buddhist ritual. Shinto has nothing to offer after death. In fact, Shinto considers everything that has to do with blood and death as impure. For business after the death grasps the Japanese, partly for that reason, to Buddhism. Indeed, Buddhism promises deliverance from this life of suffering. Most Japanese have at home two altars, a Shinto (kamidana) and a Buddhist altar (butsudan). You will find the following rituals and symbols around Japanese Temples and Shrines. A Torri, this is a traditional Japanese gate which is found at the entrance of a Shinto shrine, where it marks the transition from the sacred area around the shrine. Sometimes there are dogs to protect the Shinto complex.
Torri
The Japanese symbolically purifying themselves with water (first the left hand, right hand and then the mouth), before entering a shrine and interacting with the kami.
purifying with water
The burning of incense, waving the smoke towards themselves for purification and good luck but also as an aid in prayers.
Fox Kitsune (it wears sometimes a red slack), he is the messenger and protector of the kami Inari. Kami Inari is very important for the Japanese, because he is the God of the rice and prosperity.
Ema is a small wooden plaques on which one can write their wishes or prayers. Omikuji are fortune telling papers, which can be found in a kind of dresser with many drawers.  On the paper you can read your predictions which can vary from daikichi (good luck) to daikyo (bad luck).  If you have bad luck you can tie the paper around a tree's branch to leave it behind you.
Omikuji
Shops to buy all kind of luck amulets (omamori) with bells on them.
In Japan a lot is still paid by cash, although most hotels accept VISA or AMEX credit cards. You can of course take an amount of Yen with you but you can also withdraw cash at an ATM machine, which you can find at a post office (nearby the main railway stations) or a convenience store.
What we noticed in Tokyo
Transportation from and to the Narita International Airport.
  CityWalkSights.com     City walks along main sights, maps and an informative travel blog
hotel tip Tokyo
Hotel tip Tokyo: The hotel we stayed during our visited was the Royal Park hotel Shiodome  Tokyo it is situated in the Shimbashi district, this hotel was a good choice, the people are friendly, the rooms are clean, the beds are comfortable, breakfast is good and the hotel lies close to two main subway stations (Shimbashi and Shiodome).
If you are interested in this or another hotel in Tokyo, please check here for the availability and best offers.
Booking.com
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