The Netherlands - Alkmaar
City Walk & Travel Blog Amsterdam
Top sights Amsterdam

Amsterdam city walk route

information:

Start: central station Amsterdam Central

Distance:   7km Duration: 2.5 hours Download / print map Amsterdam city walk route:
Amsterdam travel blog
6
Amsterdam – Capital of the Netherlands May 31st, 2016 For our next Blog we visit Amsterdam. There is so much to explore and to experience in Amsterdam, that we will write several Blogs about Amsterdam. For our first Blog we make a walk through the historic center of Amsterdam. 1. Central Station of Amsterdam We are standing in front of the Central Station of Amsterdam, the starting point of this walk. This is one of the most lively points in the Netherlands. It is after the Central Station of Utrecht, the busiest station in the Netherlands. The station is built on an artificial island between 1881 and 1889 and designed by P.J.H. Cuypers, A.L. van Gendt and L.J. Eijmer.
Amsterdam Centraal Station
We go straight ahead on to the Damrak, in the earlier days this street was a canal until the Dam Square. On the left you see all the canal boats waiting for tourists, we advise you to make a cruise on one of these canal boats, it is a great way to explore the city from a total other perspective. On the right side you see all kind of hotels, restaurants, the sex museum, the Body Works exposition, coffee- and souvenir shops. 2. Beurs of Berlage Furthermore you see on the right side the Beurs of Berlage. The first stock exchange of the Netherlands was located in this building in the year 1602. The initiative for this stock exchange was made by the Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC), who needed money to finance their worldwide maritime trade activities. Later on also the shares of the West-Indische Compagnie were exchanged in this building. The building was designed by Hendrick de Keyser. The VOC was responsible for the wealth the Dutch obtained during the Golden Age (1600-1700). When you arrive at the Dam Square, you will find the following interesting buildings and attractions. At the left corner you see the De Bijenkorf, this is one of the finest department stores in Amsterdam. Furthermore you see the statue The National Monument, which is built (1956) to remember all the victims of the WOII and armed conflicts. At the corner of the Rokin you find the Dutch version of Madamme Tussauds, where you can make a selfie with your favorite famous person. Then you can turn into the Kalverstraat one of the busiest shopping streets of Amsterdam. But the most dominant building on the Dam Square is the Royal Palace. 
Damrak Amsterdam Paleis op de Dam Amsterdam Amsterdam Prinsengracht canalhouses
3. Royal Palace The Royal Palace was built between 1648-1665 and designed by Jacob van Campen. It is an important historical monument of the Golden Age. Its’ first function was Town Hall, nowadays it is used by the Royal Family to welcome foreign Heads of State and Royals and it is also used for exhibitions.
4. Nieuwe Kerk (The New Church) We pass the Nieuwe Kerk (The New Church), the building started in 1409 and went on until 1655. The Church started as a Roman Catholic Church but this changed in 1578 after the Eighty Years’ War, then it became a Protestant Church. Some famous and important Dutch men have been buried in this Church, namely Michiel de Ruyter (Admiral), Joost van den Vondel (Author) and Pieter Corneliszoon Hooft (Historian and Poem). Since 1814 the Church is used for coronations of the Dutch Kings and Queens and consecration of the Royal weddings. We cross the street and walk into the Raadhuisstraat, we follow this street until the Prinsengracht. At your right, you see the Westerkerk (designed by Hendrick de Keyser and built between 1620-1631). In this church many prominent inhabitants of Amsterdam have been buried, including Rembrandt van Rijn. 5. Anne Frank Huis We turn right into the Prinsengracht, we stop at no. 267, also known as the Achterhuis of Anne Frank, here we see a long queue, this queue is there every day of the year. In this house Anne Frank wrote her famous diary during the years that she had been hiding for the Germans during WOII. After this visit, we walk into the Prinsengracht, where we enjoy all the beautiful and old canal houses (grachtenpanden). All this houses were built during the Golden Age, in a time that Amsterdam and the Netherlands, were extremely rich and famous for their international trade.
The canals are built as an extension of the city center in the 16th century, the canals form semi-circles around the center, first the Singel, then the Herengracht, the Keizersgracht and finally the Prinsengracht. The canal houses are built slim (due tax reasons), high and deep, the front door was built higher and was only reachable by stairs, this was because of the danger of flooding. In the basement, loft and attic the trade goods were stored, the beam installation can still be found on the top level of the houses and is nowadays used for moving heavy furniture. Behind the houses there are gardens. The canal houses are used nowadays as living houses or office space.
It is a beautiful day, so we treat ourselves with an ice cream. We follow the Prinsengracht until the Leidsegracht, here we turn left until the Keizersgracht, where we turn right. Again we follow the Keizersgracht until the Nieuwe Spiegelstraat, here we turn left until the Herengracht, where we turn right. When we arrive at the Reguliersgracht we walk straight on to the Thorbeckeplein (square) and on to the Rembrandtsplein (square).
Rembrandt Square Amsterdam Rembrandtplein Amsterdam
The Rembrandtsplein is a very lively square, you will find here restaurants, bars, coffee shops, a discotheque and a cinema. The Pathé Tuschinski cinema is definitely worth visiting. The cinema was built in 1921, its’ style is a mixture of the Amsterdam School, Art Nouveau and Art Deco. We walk through the Utrechtsestraat and turn left on the Herengracht until we find ourselves on the Amstel, this is both the name of the river in front of us and the street we walk on. We turn right until the Magere Brug (Skinny Bridge). Here we cross the Amstel and turn to the left.
magere brug Amsterdam
6. Hermitage Amsterdam Here we pass the Hermitage Amsterdam, this is an annexe of the Hermitage Museum in Sint-Petersburg (Russia). To seal the 300 year-old historic bond between both cities, it was decided to set up a permanent exhibition. (Tsar Peter the Great, had run an internship in 1697 at a shipyard in the Netherlands and in the 19th century, the Dutch King William II married the Tsars’ daughter Anna Paulowna). 
Hermitage Amsterdam Het Rembrandthuis Amsterdam Snoekjesgracht Amsterdam Waag Nieuwmarkt  Amsterdam
The previous name of the building was Amstelhof and it was built in 1681 as a nursing home and it kept this purpose until 1999. The owner then decided that is was no longer suitable as a nursing home and handed it over to the municipality. The architect Hans van Heeswijk is responsible for the transformation from nursing home into museum, a lot of historical details, as for example the classical facades, retained in the renovated building. The museum was an instant success, visitors from all over the world are visiting the changing exhibitions. 7. Stopera Across the road you see a modern building, this is the Stopera (Stadhuis (Town Hall) and Opera), which was designed by Cees Dam and Wilhelm Holzbauer, it opened its doors in 1986. The building has two functions, it is both the Town Hall and the Opera House. We continue our way by turning into the Waterlooplein. The Waterlooplein is the name of this square but also the name of the eldest flea market in Amsterdam, which is held on Monday till Saturday. At the end of the Waterlooplein, you turn right and find yourself at the Zwanenburgwal. 8. Museum Het Rembrandthuis You follow this street until the Sint Antoniesbreestraat/Jodenbreestraat, here you find at your right hand the Museum Het Rembrandthuis. As the name suggests the great painter Rembrandt van Rijn has lived in this house from 1639 till 1658, he bought the house for the amount of 13.000 guilders.
We cross the street and look out over the water of the Oude Schans. We pass the Sint Antonies lock at the left bank and walk into the Snoekjesgracht. Here we cross a bridge and walk into the Krom Boomssloot, we are now entering the oldest part of the center of Amsterdam.
9. Waag We follow the Krom Boomssloot until the Koningsstraat, where we turn left straight to the Nieuwmarkt. On the Nieuwmarkt, there is a building called the Waag. It started off in the 15th century as a city gate, called the Sint Antoniepoort. In the 17th century it was reconstructed and it became a Waag, on the upper floors various guilds were accommodated, each with their own entrance, the emblems of the guilds can still be found above the entrances. In the 19th century it had several purposes, fire department, municipal archive and museum. Nowadays you can have a drink and a hot meal in the Waag because it has become a restaurant/café.
10. Red Light District We cross the square behind the Waag and walk into the Monnikenstraat (Monkstreet), this is a funny name because we now entering the Red Light District of Amsterdam, also known as De Wallen. The Red Light District stretches from the Warmoesstraat to the Zeedijk. You can find here shops, restaurants, bars, sex shops, sex clubs and window prostitution (which if a typical Dutch phenomenon). The prostitute is sitting behind a window and is luring her customers inside her little “workroom”, there she negotiates with them about the wishes and prices and close her window. This part of Amsterdam was built in the 13th century and there are prostitutes active in this area since the 15th century; depending on the prevailing morality, they are more or less tolerated. Today they even have to pay income tax!
11. Oude Kerk (Old Church) At the Oudezijds Achterburgwal we turn right and cross the first bridge on our left hand into the Oudekennissteeg. Here we cross another bridge until we stand in front of the Oude Kerk (Old Church). The Oude Kerk is the oldest still existing building of the city of Amsterdam. It was built in 1306 in honor of St. Nicolaas, bishop of Myra and patron of the sailors. It started as a Roman Catholic Church but after 1578 it became a Protestant Church. The design is Dutch Gothic and through the ages numerous of extensions and restorations have been made to the church. Inside you will find the graves of many famous inhabitants of Amsterdam, who have lived during the Golden Age. We pass the church on the Oudezijds Voorburgwal/Sint Olofssteeg and turn at the corner into the Nieuwebrugsteeg and at the end we find ourselves again on the Prins Hendrikkade in front of the Central station. So we are at the end of this enervating walk, we hope you have enjoyed it!
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Amsterdam - The Netherlands
hotel tip Amsterdam
Hotel tip Amsterdam: We found a hotel in the city center of Amsterdam, the Dream Hotel Amsterdam, which is located at the Vijzelstraat no. 73. The hotel opened its doors back in 2014, so it is a rather new hotel. The interior of the rooms is modern, the rooms are not too spacious because of the old building the hotel is situated in. Opposite of the hotel one can find a tram stop, so you can take the tram to explore Amsterdam. If you are interested in this or another hotel in Amsterdam, please check here for the availability and best offers.
Booking.com
dream hotel Amsterdam ouside dream hotel Amsterdam room hoteltip Alkmaar
  CityWalkSights.com     City walks along main sights, maps and an informative travel blog
City Walk & Travel Blog Amsterdam

Amsterdam city walk route information:

Start: railway station Amsterdam Central

Distance:   7 km Duration: 2.5 hours Download or print map Amsterdam city walk route:
Top sights Amsterdam
Amsterdam Centraal Station Damrak Amsterdam Paleis op de Dam Amsterdam Amsterdam Prinsengracht canalhouses Rembrandt Square Amsterdam magere brug Amsterdam Hermitage Amsterdam Het Rembrandthuis Amsterdam Snoekjesgracht Amsterdam Waag Nieuwmarkt  Amsterdam
Amsterdam – Capital of the Netherlands May 31st, 2016 For our next Blog we visit Amsterdam. There is so much to explore and to experience in Amsterdam, that we will write several Blogs about Amsterdam. For our first Blog we make a walk through the historic center of Amsterdam. 1. Central Station of Amsterdam We are standing in front of the Central Station of Amsterdam, the starting point of this walk. This is one of the most lively points in the Netherlands. It is after the Central Station of Utrecht, the busiest station in the Netherlands. The station is built on an artificial island between 1881 and 1889 and designed by P.J.H. Cuypers, A.L. van Gendt and L.J. Eijmer.
We go straight ahead on to the Damrak, in the earlier days this street was a canal until the Dam Square. On the left you see all the canal boats waiting for tourists, we advise you to make a cruise on one of these canal boats, it is a great way to explore the city from a total other perspective. On the right side you see all kind of hotels, restaurants, the sex museum, the Body Works exposition, coffee- and souvenir shops. 2. Beurs of Berlage Furthermore you see on the right side the Beurs of Berlage. The first stock exchange of the Netherlands was located in this building in the year 1602. The initiative for this stock exchange was made by the Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC), who needed money to finance their worldwide maritime trade activities. Later on also the shares of the West-Indische Compagnie were exchanged in this building. The building was designed by Hendrick de Keyser. The VOC was responsible for the wealth the Dutch obtained during the Golden Age (1600-1700). When you arrive at the Dam Square, you will find the following interesting buildings and attractions. At the left corner you see the De Bijenkorf, this is one of the finest department stores in Amsterdam. Furthermore you see the statue The National Monument, which is built (1956) to remember all the victims of the WOII and armed conflicts. At the corner of the Rokin you find the Dutch version of Madamme Tussauds, where you can make a selfie with your favorite famous person. Then you can turn into the Kalverstraat one of the busiest shopping streets of Amsterdam. But the most dominant building on the Dam Square is the Royal Palace. 
3. Royal Palace The Royal Palace was built between 1648-1665 and designed by Jacob van Campen. It is an important historical monument of the Golden Age. Its’ first function was Town Hall, nowadays it is used by the Royal Family to welcome foreign Heads of State and Royals and it is also used for exhibitions.
4. Nieuwe Kerk (The New Church) We pass the Nieuwe Kerk (The New Church), the building started in 1409 and went on until 1655. The Church started as a Roman Catholic Church but this changed in 1578 after the Eighty Years’ War, then it became a Protestant Church. Some famous and important Dutch men have been buried in this Church, namely Michiel de Ruyter (Admiral), Joost van den Vondel (Author) and Pieter Corneliszoon Hooft (Historian and Poem). Since 1814 the Church is used for coronations of the Dutch Kings and Queens and consecration of the Royal weddings. We cross the street and walk into the Raadhuisstraat, we follow this street until the Prinsengracht. At your right, you see the Westerkerk (designed by Hendrick de Keyser and built between 1620-1631). In this church many prominent inhabitants of Amsterdam have been buried, including Rembrandt van Rijn. 5. Anne Frank Huis We turn right into the Prinsengracht, we stop at no. 267, also known as the Achterhuis of Anne Frank, here we see a long queue, this queue is there every day of the year. In this house Anne Frank wrote her famous diary during the years that she had been hiding for the Germans during WOII. After this visit, we walk into the Prinsengracht, where we enjoy all the beautiful and old canal houses (grachtenpanden). All this houses were built during the Golden Age, in a time that Amsterdam and the Netherlands, were extremely rich and famous for their international trade.
The canals are built as an extension of the city center in the 16th century, the canals form semi- circles around the center, first the Singel, then the Herengracht, the Keizersgracht and finally the Prinsengracht. The canal houses are built slim (due  tax reasons), high and deep, the front door was built higher and was only reachable by stairs, this was because of the danger of flooding. In the basement, loft and attic the trade goods were stored, the beam installation can still be found on the top level of the houses and is nowadays used for moving heavy furniture. Behind the houses there are gardens. The canal houses are used nowadays as living houses or office space.
It is a beautiful day, so we treat ourselves with an ice cream. We follow the Prinsengracht until the Leidsegracht, here we turn left until the Keizersgracht, where we turn right. Again we follow the Keizersgracht until the Nieuwe Spiegelstraat, here we turn left until the Herengracht, where we turn right. When we arrive at the Reguliersgracht we walk straight on to the Thorbeckeplein (square) and on to the Rembrandtsplein (square).
The Rembrandtsplein is a very lively square, you will find here restaurants, bars, coffee shops, a discotheque and a cinema. The Pathé Tuschinski cinema is definitely worth visiting. The cinema was built in 1921, its’ style is a mixture of the Amsterdam School, Art Nouveau and Art Deco. We walk through the Utrechtsestraat and turn left on the Herengracht until we find ourselves on the Amstel, this is both the name of the river in front of us and the street we walk on. We turn right until the Magere Brug (Skinny Bridge). Here we cross the Amstel and turn to the left.
6. Hermitage Amsterdam Here we pass the Hermitage Amsterdam, this is an annexe of the Hermitage Museum in Sint- Petersburg (Russia). To seal the 300 year-old historic bond between both cities, it was decided to set up a permanent exhibition. (Tsar Peter the Great, had run an internship in 1697 at a shipyard in the Netherlands and in the 19th century, the Dutch King William II married the Tsars’ daughter Anna Paulowna). 
The previous name of the building was Amstelhof and it was built in 1681 as a nursing home and it kept this purpose until 1999. The owner then decided that is was no longer suitable as a nursing home and handed it over to the municipality. The architect Hans van Heeswijk is responsible for the transformation from nursing home into museum, a lot of historical details, as for example the classical facades, retained in the renovated building. The museum was an instant success, visitors from all over the world are visiting the changing exhibitions. 7. Stopera Across the road you see a modern building, this is the Stopera (Stadhuis (Town Hall) and Opera), which was designed by Cees Dam and Wilhelm Holzbauer, it opened its doors in 1986. The building has two functions, it is both the Town Hall and the Opera House. We continue our way by turning into the Waterlooplein. The Waterlooplein is the name of this square but also the name of the eldest flea market in Amsterdam, which is held on Monday till Saturday. At the end of the Waterlooplein, you turn right and find yourself at the Zwanenburgwal. 8. Museum Het Rembrandthuis You follow this street until the Sint Antoniesbreestraat/Jodenbreestraat, here you find at your right hand the Museum Het Rembrandthuis. As the name suggests the great painter Rembrandt van Rijn has lived in this house from 1639 till 1658, he bought the house for the amount of 13.000 guilders.
We cross the street and look out over the water of the Oude Schans. We pass the Sint Antonies lock at the left bank and walk into the Snoekjesgracht. Here we cross a bridge and walk into the Krom Boomssloot, we are now entering the oldest part of the center of Amsterdam.
9. Waag We follow the Krom Boomssloot until the Koningsstraat, where we turn left straight to the Nieuwmarkt. On the Nieuwmarkt, there is a building called the Waag. It started off in the 15th century as a city gate, called the Sint Antoniepoort. In the 17th  century it was reconstructed and it became a Waag, on the upper floors various guilds were accommodated, each with their own entrance, the emblems of the guilds can still be found above the entrances. In the 19th century it had several purposes, fire department, municipal archive and museum. Nowadays you can have a drink and a hot meal in the Waag because it has become a restaurant/café.
10. Red Light District We cross the square behind the Waag and walk into the Monnikenstraat (Monkstreet), this is a funny name because we now entering the Red Light District of Amsterdam, also known as De Wallen. The Red Light District stretches from the Warmoesstraat to the Zeedijk. You can find here shops, restaurants, bars, sex shops, sex clubs and window prostitution (which if a typical Dutch phenomenon). The prostitute is sitting behind a window and is luring her customers inside her little “workroom”, there she negotiates with them about the wishes and prices and close her window. This part of Amsterdam was built in the 13th  century and there are prostitutes active in this area since the 15th century; depending on the prevailing morality, they are more or less tolerated. Today they even have to pay income tax!
11. Oude Kerk (Old Church) At the Oudezijds Achterburgwal we turn right and cross the first bridge on our left hand into the Oudekennissteeg. Here we cross another bridge until we stand in front of the Oude Kerk (Old Church). The Oude Kerk is the oldest still existing building of the city of Amsterdam. It was built in 1306 in honor of St. Nicolaas, bishop of Myra and patron of the sailors. It started as a Roman Catholic Church but after 1578 it became a Protestant Church. The design is Dutch Gothic and through the ages numerous of extensions and restorations have been made to the church. Inside you will find the graves of many famous inhabitants of Amsterdam, who have lived during the Golden Age. We pass the church on the Oudezijds Voorburgwal/Sint Olofssteeg and turn at the corner into the Nieuwebrugsteeg and at the end we find ourselves again on the Prins Hendrikkade in front of the Central station. So we are at the end of this enervating walk, we hope you have enjoyed it!
Booking.com
hoteltip Amsterdam
Hotel tip Amsterdam: We found a hotel in the city center of Amsterdam, the Dream Hotel Amsterdam, which is located at the Vijzelstraat no. 73. The hotel opened its doors back in 2014, so it is a rather new hotel. The interior of the rooms is modern, the rooms are not too spacious because of the old building the hotel is situated in. Opposite of the hotel one can find a tram stop, so you can take the tram to explore Amsterdam. If you are interested in this or another hotel in Amsterdam, please check here for the availability and best offers.
dream hotel Amsterdam ouside dream hotel Amsterdam room
  CityWalkSights.com     City walks along main sights, maps and an informative travel blog
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