Imperial Palace
Imperial Palace
Imperial Palace
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General information:
The Imperial Palace (1888) is located on the former site of Edo Castle. As the name suggests, is it the residence of the Imperial Family. The Imperial Palace is surrounded by a park, which is open for public. Edo Castle was the residence of the Tokugawa shogun, who ruled Japan from 1603-1867. In 1868 the Emperor was restored and moved from Kyoto to Tokyo. The palace was destroyed by air raids during WOII but was rebuilt in its original style after the WOII. Visitors are able to view from the Kokyo Gaien (large square in front of the Imperial Palace) the two bridges (Nijubashi) that lead to the entrance to the inner palace grounds. The stone bridge is called Meganebashi (which means glasses bridge). The bridge in the back is named Nijubashi (which means double bridge). The inner palace grounds are not open to the public, only on January 2 and December 23 (birthday of Emperor) visitors are allowed to enter the inner palace ground and see the members of the Imperial Family standing on the balcony. Although it is possible to make a reservation beforehand for a guided tour. The reservation must be made at the Imperial Household Agency. During the tour no buildings will be entered. The tours are held in Japanese, with the possibility of an English audio guide.
Getting there: Subway station Tokyo
Imperial palace Tokyo
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Imperial Palace
General information:
Getting there: Subway station Tokyo
Imperial Palace
The Imperial Palace (1888) is located on the former site of Edo Castle. As the name suggests, is it the residence of the Imperial Family. The Imperial Palace is surrounded by a park, which is open for public. Edo Castle was the residence of the Tokugawa shogun, who ruled Japan from 1603-1867. In 1868 the Emperor was restored and moved from Kyoto to Tokyo. The palace was destroyed by air raids during WOII but was rebuilt in its original style after the WOII. Visitors are able to view from the Kokyo Gaien (large square in front of the Imperial Palace) the two bridges (Nijubashi) that lead to the entrance to the inner palace grounds. The stone bridge is called Meganebashi (which means glasses bridge). The bridge in the back is named Nijubashi (which means double bridge). The inner palace grounds are not open to the public, only on January 2 and December 23 (birthday of Emperor) visitors are allowed to enter the inner palace ground and see the members of the Imperial Family standing on the balcony. Although it is possible to make a reservation beforehand for a guided tour. The reservation must be made at the Imperial Household Agency. During the tour no buildings will be entered. The tours are held in Japanese, with the possibility of an English audio guide.
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